Tips for speakers #1: don’t thank the audience for their attention

One problem anyone faces in putting any sort of talk together is how to finish.  And a depressingly large number of speakers do so with a slide like this

Screenshot 2019-06-15 at 15.27.05

This way of ending a talk came originally, I think, from Japan. And unless you are Japanese you should never use it. A Japanese speaker has centuries of proud samurai tradition behind them, and when they say ” thank you for your attention” what they mean is

Screenshot 2019-06-15 at 15.22.15

If you are not Japanese this does not work. Instead the message conveyed is

Screenshot 2019-06-15 at 15.24.52

Which is not a good way to finish.

And this throws away a golden opportunity.  The end of the talk is the point at which you really have the attention of the audience. This may not be for the best of reasons – perhaps they want to hear the next speaker, or to go off for much-needed coffee, but when you put your conclusions slide up your listeners’ brains move up a gear. They look up from the email on their laptops and wonder what’s next. So your final message is the one with the best chance of being remembered.

Give them the pitch that you hope they’ll take away with them.

“So we have the best results yet on ….”

“So we have the prospect of getting the best results on … in time for next year’s conference”

“There are going to be many applications of this technique”

“We understand the whole process of … a lot better”

Whatever’s appropriate.  Be positive and upbeat and, even if they’ve been asleep for the past 20 minutes,  they will go away with a good feeling about your work, your talk, and your ability as a speaker.

 

(See what I just did??)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by

rogerjbarlow

After his PhD at Cambridge, he has worked on particle physics experiments at DESY (TASSO, and the discovery of the gluon, and subsequently JADE, and the measurement of the B lifetime) , CERN (OPAL doing precision studies of the Z ), and SLAC(BaBar, and the discovery of CP violation in B mesons). He is currently a member of the LHCb collaboration. After many years at Manchester, rising from lecturer to professor, he moved to Huddersfield in 2011, from where he retired in 2017 He has written a textbook on Statistics, founded the Cockcroft Institute, started the ThorEA association, and originated the National Particle Physics Masterclasses. He was the PI of the CONFORM project that led to the successful operation of EMMA, the worlds's first nsFFAG accelerator.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.